Sawyer

When I was tinkering with cold brew I found that anything natural processed worked super nice.

That slightly fermented boozy taste comes out as a very noticeable sweetness, to the point where my colleague couldn't believe I hadn't added sugar. It would have been quite a light roast, I love me an etheopian in any circumstance, but you might be a bit late for them this year.

Another thing I found was the taste difference between fresh and oxidised is huge, but also entirely up to personal preference.

The melting point of When I was tinkering with cold brew I found that anything natural processed worked super nice. That slightly fermented boozy taste comes out as a very noticeable sweetness, to the point where my colleague couldn't believe I hadn't added sugar.

It would have been quite a light roast, I love me an etheopian in any circumstance, but you might be a bit late for them this year. Another thing I found was the taste difference between fresh and oxidised is huge, but also entirely up to personal preference. is 460°F and it is not until a Full French Roast that the temperature of the beans goes above that temperature for any significant amount of time. The autoignition point of caffeine however (value listed in previous caffeine link) is not until 1004°F.

As the roast progresses the coffee beans expand, so darker roasted coffee is much less dense than lighter roast.

Most people are measuring beans by volume rather than mass so the major contributor to light roasts being perceived as more caffeinated is that people are often actually using more coffee since the beans / grounds pack more tightly. If you take what appear to be two equivalent volume scoops of coffee, one light roast and one dark roast, and weigh them on a scale, the dark roast coffee might for example be 15g while the same size scoop of light roast coffee is more like 18g.

In a cafe setting where the beans are being measured by mass, people who have previously been told that light roast is more potent have that expectation and may psychosomatically experience a stronger stimulation.

Never underestimate the placebo effect.

The pit of the fruit of the Coffea arabica plant (coffee beans) average 1.3% caffeine by mass regardless of roast level, though there is of course variation from plant to plant and their individual growing conditions.

The dose by mass of coffee grounds that was brewed is the relevant determinant of total caffeine content of a cup of coffee.

With that said, immersion cold brew is my favorite way of making coffee in the summertime. But I never really messed with it myself until this year. Right now I'm using a single source coffee from Nicaragua, but I've used Honduran and Yirgacheffe and they all turn out well. I've heard to be careful with some Latin American beans since they aren't very mold resistant in Cold Brew